Sunday, February 17, 2008

Wakefield's History of the Black Hawk War

John Wakefield was one of the first militiamen called to the colors to fight Chief Blackhawk's incursion into Illinois. Instead of returning home when his first term expired, Wakefield stayed on as a volunteer scout and surgeon's mate for the length of the war. His account, reproduced here, is one of the few primary accounts that covers the entire war. Unlike other memoirists of the war, Wakefield wrote his account almost immediately after he returned home.

Wakefield's story is more than an eyewitness view of the war. His work provides a unique insight into the racial hatred at the core of this war. His acocunt also highlights how just how tenuous state and federal governmental control was during this part of American history. This primary work provides a useful tool for examining the social structure of the Illinois frontier. Because of the uniques insights provided, Wakefield's work should be seen as something more than a simple military history.

The edition used for the online version is the second one, reprinted in 1907. Since most of the copies of the first edition were destroyed and only a handful (200) of the second were made, Wakefield's account is exceedingly difficult to find. Full citation for the work is: Wakefield's History of the Blackhawk War: A Reprint of the First Edition By John A. Wakefield, Esquire, From the Press of Calvin Goudy, Jacksonville, Illinois, 1834, Frank Everett Stevens, Chicago: Caxton Club, 1908.

Wakefield's History of the Blackhawk War at Lincoln Library in Illinois.
Incredible original, full version of book that is searchable with ability to view each page.






John Allen Wakefield

Biography by Frank Stevens

JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD, second son of William and Diana (Varner) Wakefield, was born February 11, 1797, at Pendleton, South Carolina. The father was a native of North Carolina, of Scotch Irish ancestry. The mother (who died at Quincy, Illinois, at the age of nearly 107 years) was a native of South Carolina, of Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot ancestry. The father, William, a man of education, spent most of his manhood as a teacher. John Allen received his name in honor of Major-General John Allen of Virginia, who was a cousin to Diana Varner Wakefield. When he was seven years old, John's parents moved to middle Tennessee, where they remained but a short time, and then pushed on to Barren County, Kentucky.


In 1808, the family removed to Illinois Territory, settling where Lebanon, St. Clair County, is now located. During the first two years of life in Illinois, and while the family was "forted," owing to the hostility of the Indians, privations without number were endured. The War of 1812-14, which followed, was particularly aggressive and sanguinary in Illinois. Militia companies, organized for campaign and scouting duties, constantly patroled the state.


Wakefield, though but sixteen years of age, manifested an unusual aptitude for scouting service, and to gratify a passion for that service, he enlisted in the company of Captain Jacob Short, in which he served from February 27 to June 9, 1813. Afterward he served as special scout for General Howard, earning the highest praises from that faithful officer, particularly as the bearer of dispatches, later called "expresses." One of his trips was fraught with such peril that his father applied for a writ of habeas corpus to take him from it; but learning of the issuance of the writ, he stole away in the night and crossed the Mississippi in a canoe, swimming his horse behind. The trip was made in answer to a call from General Russell, then at St. Louis, for a volunteer to carry dispatches to Vin-cennes (called in the vernacular of the day Post Vin-san), through a trackless wilderness of 17 miles, swarming with hostile Indians. It proved as perilous as had been anticipated, but he made it safely, returning by another route. One night he camped in a sinkhole. The following morning was foggy. A war party of unusual size was heard approaching. His horse became nervous and liable at any moment to attract attention; but he hastily threw a blanket over its head, and the party passed within a few feet of the sink-hole, without detecting him.


The dangers and struggles of the Illinois frontiersman during those perilous days cannot be magnified, and Wakefield had his full share of them. At the close of the war he went to Cincinnati, where he studied medicine diligently for a considerable period, afterward going to St. Louis to finish his studies. But it seems that once in possession of his diploma, he decided medicine did not offer him the field anticipated, and at once turned to studying for the bar, to which he was admitted when in his twenty-first year. His examination was conducted at Vandalla, where he settled and remained until 1837, during the last three years of which time he saw much of Abraham Lincoln. As an outgrowth of an intimacy formed in the Black Hawk campaign, Mr. Lincoln, while a member of the legislature, lived with Mr. Wakefield in Vandalia.


In 1818 Wakefield was married to Eliza Thompson, a native of Bourbon County, Kentucky, daughter of Abram Thompson and Elizabeth (Brown) Thompson. One of the most important services rendered by Wakefield, and one which should command the respect of every Illinoisan, was his determined stand against the introduction of slavery in the State of Illinois, attempted during the administration of Governor Edward Coles. The legislature which convened at Vandalia, December 2, 1822, and adjourned February 18, 1823, passed a resolution by infamous means, calling for a constitutional convention, at which an amendment was expected to be framed which would permit slavery in the State. For sixteen months the young State was a battle-ground, during which the anti-convention men were made targets for every manner of insult and assault. Wakefield, being a ready speaker and writer, plunged into the campaign with great vigor, paying his own expenses while canvassing the State, and had the satisfaction of witnessing the rout of the slavery or convention men by a decisive victory. For his services during that campaign, he was elected a member of the next (fourth) House of Representatives, which sat from November 15, 1824, to January 18, 1825 and from January 2 to January 18, 1826. From "The Vandalia Whig" of July 3, 1834, I notice that he was a candidate for Representative against Robert Blackwell and Colonel Samuel Houston, but Mr. Blackwell was elected.


When Governor Reynolds called for volunteers to drive out Black Hawk in 1832, Wakefield enlisted in the company of Captain John Dement. It was mustered into service April 20, but with the entire army was mustered out May 28th, after the unfortunate Stillman's battle. Neither Wakefield nor Captain Dement's company participated in Stillman's battle. When a new levy of troops reached Dixon's Ferry; Wakefield was found enlisted in the company of Captain William L. D. Ewing. Ewing, being elected Major of a spy battalion, served as captain but a day or so, and Captain Samuel Huston (or Houston) succeeded in command. First appointed surgeon, by reason of his medical knowledge, Wakefield was speedily transferred to the scouting service, in which he continued to the end of the war. For his efficient work he was promoted to the rank of Major. At the Bad Axe battle, fought at the mouth of the Bad Axe River, he received a slight wound. As that engagement finished the war and the fighting career of Black Hawk, the army marched overland to Dixon's Ferry, where Wakefield was discharged by Lieutenant Robert Anderson, August 16, 1832.


The following year Major Wakefield wrote the history of that war, which is hereafter set forth. Written when fresh in his memory, and from his daily journal kept without interruption from its beginning to its end, this first history of the war must be accorded accuracy as well as general interest. Inasmuch as the records of the War Department do not disclose the names of many of the officers, the value of the record which Wakefield's book supplied is inconceivable. The first edition ofthe book was published in Jacksonville, Illinois, in 1834, by Calvin Goudy. Its dimensions are 7 by 4 1/8 inches. It contains blank leaf, titlepage, certificate of copyright, four pages of "preface," four pages of "contents " (all of which are numbered as follows: iii not numbered, iv, v, vi, vii, viii, ix, and x), 142 pages of text, beginning with page i (not numbered), and followed from 2 consecutively to and including 142, and two blank leaves. The binding was made in boards with mottled covers, calf back, and red leather label stamped in gilt with the words, " Black Hawk War." The edges were stained a canary color. A second edition, thoroughly revised and very much enlarged, was published at Cincinnati in the year 1836. Only 300 copies were delivered, the others being destroyed by a fire which burned the establishment and its contents. Copies of the latter edition are so rare that not one has been offered for sale for at least fifteen years.


The Black Hawk War having made the people of southern Illinois acquainted with the fertility and richness of the northern part of the State and the southern part of Wisconsin, a series of northward migrations set in. In 1837 Major Wakefield joined in the hegira, and settled in Jo Daviess County, where he remained, with the exception of the years 1839 and 1840, spent in Carroll County, until 1846, when he crossed over into Iowa County, Wisconsin, and there remained until the spring of 1849. In that year he removed to St. Paul, Minnesota, and was elected its first city judge. The winters of Minnesota were so severe that he moved again southward to Allamakee County, Iowa, in 1851, where he lived until 1854. Then he went to Kansas to enjoy its milder climate, and settled at the point which subsequently became Lawrence, whence not more than half a dozen families had preceded him. Becoming a landholder, he remained at that place until the day of his death, June 18, 1873.


Upon the history of Kansas Wakefield left an indelible imprint. There the question of slavery had to be fought as he had fought it in Illinois thirty years before. In his new home the struggle was much longer, and he suffered the loss of much of the considerable wealth which he had accumulated in Minnesota and Iowa. But his fortunes improving, he became a strong factor in moulding Kansas into a rich commonwealth, and his declining years were prosperous. In the struggle in Kansas with the slavery element, he was made the first free-state candidate for delegate to Congress, for which office he received three fourths of the legal votes cast at the election. But it will be remembered, that following the hint of Senator Atchison of Missouri, "When you reside within one day of the Territory, you can send five hundred of your young men who will vote in favor of your institutions," voters were poured into Kansas from Missouri, and the candidate of the slave-holding interests was elected by an enormous majority. Indeed, he received eleven hundred votes more than the number of legal voters in the Territory three months afterward. Wakefield was elected State Treasurer under the Topeka constitution which he had helped to frame, and as chairman of the judiciary committee of the first and many succeeding legislatures, was largely responsible for the State's excellent code of laws.


Lawrence was the storm-center of those perilous times. During the fierce "border troubles," when the Territory was constantly invaded by large bodies of armed men from Missouri, Wakefield was constantly the leader of the free-state settlers, and for his courage and pertinacity in opposing the slavery forces was made the principal target for their attacks. Just west of Lawrence he had built a large house and many substantial out-buildings, but the invaders, on the night of September 1, 1856, fired and burned every building on the place. The fine library in the house and two manuscripts ready for publication, together with 140 acres of wheat and oats in the stack, were destroyed. That disaster involved a loss of $10,000. The attack was so sudden and unexpected, that the escape of the family was nothing short of miraculous.


Judge Wakefield, as he was called the latter years of his life, died at Lawrence June 18,1873, in his seventy-seventh year. To conclude, it should be added that his wife Eliza died in 1871. From the union twelve children were born, eight of whom reached middle age or more. Lysander and Alvin, first and second sons respectively, died at Vandalia in childhood. George Washington, the third son, lost his life by an accident in California when about 45 years of age. Mrs. Mary A. Willard, eldest daughter, died December 7, 1903, in Los Angeles, California, at the age of 82. Martha Ann Wakefield died near Lawrence in 1855. Mrs. Emily Terry, third daughter, resides at present in the city of Chicago. Mrs. Eliza J. Snyder, fourth daughter, died at Lawrence, December 7, 1902. William H. T. Wakefield, fourth son, to whom I am under obligation for the facts herein stated, is a resident of Mound City, Kansas. John Alien, Jr., died July 31,1865, aged 29 years. Thomas J., the youngest, was accidentally killed at Denver, Colorado, November i, 1890, by the fall of a derrick. Two daughters, Sarah and Diana, died in infancy.

Unverified Genealogy of the Verner and Wakefields

From Phillips V. Bradford Genealogical Site

Descendants of Diana Verner

Generation No. 1

1. DIANA VERNER (JOHN 1) was born 1772 in Keowee, Washington Dist, South Carolina, and died in Quincy, Adams Co., Illinois. She married WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD 1792 in Wakefield, North Carolina, son of HENRY WAKEFIELD and JENNY ALLEN. He was born 1765 in Wakefield, North Carolina, and died 1817 in Belleville, St. Clair Co., Illinois.

More About DIANA VERNER:
  • Census 1818: Bond Co., Illinois
  • Census 1820: Vandalia Twp., Bond Co., IL
More About WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1800: Pendleton Dist, SC; pg. 25; family group:30010-00100-00
More About WILLIAM WAKEFIELD and DIANA VERNER:
  • Marriage: 1792, Wakefield, North Carolina

Children of DIANA VERNER and WILLIAM WAKEFIELD are:

1. WILLIAM WAKEFIELD, b. 1793.
2. GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD, b. 1795, Wakefield, Wake Co., North Carolina; d. September 1856, Cass, Missouri.
3. JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD, b. January 22, 1797, Pendleton, Richland Co., South Carolina; d. June 18, 1873, Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas.
4. ANDREW JACKSON WAKEFIELD, b. 1799, Wakefield, Wake Co., North Carolina.
5. JAMES HENRY WAKEFIELD, b. 1801, Wakefield, Wake Co., North Carolina; d. 1806, Illinois.

More About JAMES HENRY WAKEFIELD:
  • Story says he was killed by wolves.
6. MATILDA ELIZABETH WAKEFIELD, b. 1803, Galeza, Jo Daviess Co., Illinois; m. JONATHON MILLER.
7. JENNY WAKEFIELD, b. 1805; m. ? KENNEDY.
8. MARY WAKEFIELD, b. 1807; m. ? SCALES.
9. SARAH WAKEFIELD, b. May 11, 1809, Kentucky; d. August 05, 1892, Mascelline, Adams Co., Illinois.

Generation No. 2

2. GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD (WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born 1795 in Wakefield, Wake Co., North Carolina, and died September 1856 in Cass, Missouri. He married JOANNA RUTH OSBORN September 24, 1826 in Vermilion Co., Illinois, daughter of ROBERT OSBURN and MARY PRICE. She was born Abt. 1809 in Barren Co, Kentucky, and died September 16, 1855 in Xenia, Franklin Twp., Bourbon Co., Kansas.

Notes for GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD:
  • George Washington Wakefield was killed in the Kansas raids of 1856. He appears to have moved from Missouri to get away from slavery only to lose his life to the Missouri raiders in the struggle that followed. According to the Wakefield Memorial, George Washington Wakefield, son of John Wakefield was born in South Carolina. He moved with his father to Illinois in 1810. He served in the war of 1812 and the Black Hawk War, moved to Missouri about 1838 and settled in Bates County. In 1854, he moved to Bourbon County, Kansas where he was taken by pro-slavery men, from Missouri, and after being robbed of $3000 of money and livestock, he was carried away and murdered, all because he was a "free state man," leaving his six orphan children destitute on the ashes of their burned home. His wife Ruth Osburn had died just previously.
  • Census 1: 1850,: Bates Co., Missouri
More About JOANNA RUTH OSBORN:
  • Census 1850: Bates Co., Missouri
More About GEORGE WAKEFIELD and JOANNA OSBORN:
  • Marriage: September 24, 1826, Vermilion Co., Illinois
Children of GEORGE WAKEFIELD and JOANNA OSBORN are:

2.1. WILLIAM WAKEFIELD, b. August 1827, Illinois.
2.2. SUSAN WAKEFIELD, b. February 13, 1830, Illinois; d. February 13, 1853, Bates, Missouri.
2.3. JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD, b. April 28, 1832, Illinois; d. January 10, 1864.

More About JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1850,: Bates Co., Missouri
2.4. ALMEDA WAKEFIELD, b. March 23, 1834, Illinois; d. November 27, 1878, Xenia, Boubon Co., Kansas.
2.5. MARTHA ADELINE WAKEFIELD, b. August 15, 1838, Illinois; d. December 16, 1911, McMinnville, Oregon; m. WILLIAM J. MORGAN, 1853, Missouri.

More About MARTHA ADELINE WAKEFIELD:
  • Burial: McMinnville, Oregon, Masonic Cem.
  • Census 1850: Bates Co., Missouri
More About WILLIAM MORGAN and MARTHA WAKEFIELD:
  • Marriage: 1853, Missouri
2.6. DIANA WAKEFIELD, b. March 12, 1844, Missouri; m. ? CLARK.

More About DIANA WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1850: Bates Co., Missouri
2.7. ALRATHA WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1847, Missouri.

More About ALRATHA WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1850: Bates Co., Missouri
2.8. GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD, b. March 31, 1849, Bates Co., Missouri; d. October 11, 1931, Mound City, Lynn Co., Kansas; m. ELIZABETH J. SMITH, February 14, 1881.

More About GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD:
  • Burial: Curry Cem. Mound City, Lynn Co., Kansas
  • Census 1850,: Bates Co., Missouri
More About GEORGE WAKEFIELD and ELIZABETH SMITH:
  • Marriage: February 14, 1881

3. JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD (WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born January 22, 1797 in Pendleton, Richland Co., South Carolina, and died June 18, 1873 in Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas. He married ELIZA BROWN THOMPSON 1818 in Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois, daughter of ABRAM THOMPSON and ELIZABETH BROWN. She was born June 11, 1799 in Bourbon, Kentucky, and died May 09, 1871 in Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas.

More About JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD:
  • Burial: Oak Hill Cem., Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas
  • Census 1860: Douglas Co., Kansas
  • Occupation: Farmer
More About ELIZA BROWN THOMPSON:
  • Burial: Oak Hill Cem., Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas
  • Census 1: 1860,: Douglas Co., Kansas
More About JOHN WAKEFIELD and ELIZA THOMPSON:
  • Marriage: 1818, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois
Children of JOHN WAKEFIELD and ELIZA THOMPSON are:

3.1. LIVING WAKEFIELD.
3.2. LYSANDER WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1819, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; d. Abt. 1821, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois.
3.3. ALVIN WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1820, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; d. Abt. 1821, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois.
3.4. GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD, b. 1822, St. Clair, Shelby Co., Illinois; d. Abt. 1867, California; m. (1) NARCISSA WILLIARD; m. (2) ?, Abt. 1846, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois.
3.5. MARY ANNE WAKEFIELD, b. June 11, 1823, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; d. December 07, 1903, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California.
3.6. MARTHA ANN WAKEFIELD, b. 1826, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; d. 1855, Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas.
3.7. EMILY B. WAKEFIELD, b. October 01, 1829, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; m. (1) JOHN CULVER TERRY; m. (2) EMMONS DIX CHASE.

More About EMILY B. WAKEFIELD:
  • Resided in Vandalia, IL., Galena, IL., and St. Paul, Minnesota
3.8. WILLIAM HARRISON THOMPSON WAKEFIELD, b. December 13, 1834, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; d. July 26, 1913, Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas.
3.9. ELIZA J. WAKEFIELD, b. May 1835, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; d. December 07, 1902, Los Angeles, California.
3.10. JOHN ALLEN JR. WAKEFIELD, b. 1837, Cold Springs, Shelby Co., Illinois; d. January 31, 1865.

More About JOHN ALLEN JR. WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1860: Douglas Co., Kansas
3.11. THOMAS JEFFERSON WAKEFIELD, b. 1838, Cold Springs, Shelby Co., Illinois; d. November 01, 1890, Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado.

More About THOMAS JEFFERSON WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1860: Douglas Co., Kansas
3.12. SARAH WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1840, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois.
3.13. DIANA WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1842, Illinois; d. Bef. 1843.

4. ANDREW JACKSON WAKEFIELD (WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born 1799 in Wakefield, Wake Co., North Carolina. He married NANCY GARNER. She was born 1812 in North Carolina, and died 1886 in Fresno, Kern Co., California.

More About ANDREW JACKSON WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1850: Ursa, Adams Co., Illinois, Henry Wakefield 30, living with Andrew Jackson Wakefield
  • Occupation: Farmer
  • Nancy Garner also living with Andrew Jackson Wakefield.
Children of ANDREW WAKEFIELD and NANCY GARNER are:

4.1. ELIZA A. WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1839, Illinois.

More About ELIZA A. WAKEFIELD:
  • Census 1850: Ursa, Adams Co., Illinois

4.2. JOHN WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1844, Illinois.

More About JOHN WAKEFIELD:

  • Census 1850: Ursa, Adams Co., Illinois

4.3. MATILDA WAKEFIELD, b. Abt. 1845, Illinois; m. ALLEN BARR, December 18, 1862, Adams Co., Illinois.

More About MATILDA WAKEFIELD:

  • Census 1850: Ursa, Adams Co., Illinois

More About ALLEN BARR and MATILDA WAKEFIELD:

  • Marriage: December 18, 1862, Adams Co., Illinois

4.4. SARAH ANN WAKEFIELD, b. 1848, Quincy, Illinois; d. 1924, East Highlands, California.

9. SARAH WAKEFIELD (WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born May 11, 1809 in Kentucky, and died August 05, 1892 in Mascelline, Adams Co., Illinois. She married (1) ? PALMER Bef. 1831. She married (2) RUDIAN LEMMON, JR. Bef. 1836. He was born October 26, 1801.

More About SARAH WAKEFIELD:
  • Burial: Mascelline, Adams Co., IL, Keith Cem.
  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois
More About RUDIAN LEMMON, JR.:
  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois
Child of SARAH WAKEFIELD and ? PALMER is:

9.1. DIANA PALMER, b. 1831.

Children of SARAH WAKEFIELD and RUDIAN LEMMON are:

9.2. NANCY J. LEMMON, b. 1836, Illinois.

More About NANCY J. LEMMON:
  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois
9.3. WILLIAM DANIEL LEMMON, b. February 17, 1837, Illinois.

More About WILLIAM DANIEL LEMMON:
  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois
9.4. LOUISA LEMMON, b. 1839, Illinois.

More About LOUISA LEMMON:
  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois
9.5. CALVIN LEMMON, b. January 03, 1842, Illinois.

More About CALVIN LEMMON:
  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois
9.6. RUDIAN LEMMON III, b. January 07, 1843, Illinois; d. March 12, 1912, Adams Co., Illinois.
9.7. SARAH LEMMON, b. 1848, Illinois.

More About SARAH LEMMON:
  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois

Generation No. 3

2.2. SUSAN WAKEFIELD (GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born February 13, 1830 in Illinois, and died February 13, 1853 in Bates, Missouri. She married DANIEL FRANCIS 1849 in Illinois. He was born January 27, 1823 in Ohio, and died May 17, 1904 in Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas.

More About DANIEL FRANCIS and SUSAN WAKEFIELD:
  • Marriage: 1849, Illinois
Children of SUSAN WAKEFIELD and DANIEL FRANCIS are:

2.2.1. MARTHA FRANCIS, b. February 14, 1850, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. October 26, 1898, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas.
2.2.2. JOANNE FRANCIS, b. August 18, 1852, Bates, Missouri; m. THOMAS MAWHITER, February 1876; b. Abt. 1848, Bates, Missouri.

2.4. ALMEDA WAKEFIELD (GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born March 23, 1834 in Illinois, and died
November 27, 1878 in Xenia, Boubon Co., Kansas. She married DANIEL FRANCIS March 31, 1853 in Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas. He was born January 27, 1823 in Ohio, and died May 17, 1904 in Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas.

More About ALMEDA WAKEFIELD:
  • Burial: Stevenson Cemetery
  • Census 1850: Bates Co., Missouri
More About DANIEL FRANCIS and ALMEDA WAKEFIELD:
  • Marriage: March 31, 1853, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas

Children of ALMEDA WAKEFIELD and DANIEL FRANCIS are:

2.4.1. WILLIAM FRANCIS, b. February 11, 1854, Prob. MO or KS; d. September 18, 1854.
2.4.2. SUSAN A. FRANCIS, b. June 18, 1855, Prob. MO or KS; d. September 14, 1855.
2.4.3. CLARA ELIZABETH FRANCIS, b. October 22, 1857, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. August 24, 1934; m. THOMAS MAWHITER, July 24, 1882; b. Abt. 1848, Bates, Missouri.
2.4.4. CHESTON E. FRANCIS, b. March 12, 1860; d. May 07, 1951; m. ESTER ROSS, November 24, 1884; b. Abt. 1864, Prob. KS.
2.4.5. EMMALINE FRANCIS, b. August 01, 1863, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. April 30, 1960; m. GEORGE MEAD, December 31, 1884; b. Abt. 1859, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas.
2.4.6. EVALINE FRANCIS, b. August 01, 1863, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. Bef. 1871.
2.4.7. ANNA C. FRANCIS, b. December 12, 1865, Prob. KS; d. December 24, 1951; m. JOSIAH S. REAM, October 23, 1893; b. Abt. 1861, Prob. KS.
2.4.8. JOHN D. FRANCIS, b. March 04, 1870, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. March 04, 1950; m. BERTHA DAGGETT, August 1898; b. Abt. 1874, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas.
2.4.9. CLARENCE LEVI FRANCIS, b. January 27, 1873, Prob. KS; d. February 15, 1903.
2.4.10. GEORGE AUGUSTUS FRANCIS, b. October 15, 1876, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. 1954.

3.5. MARY ANNE WAKEFIELD (JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born June 11, 1823 in Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois, and died December 07, 1903 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California. She married ALEXANDER H. WILLIARD II December 24, 1837 in Grant Co., Wisconsin, son of ALEXANDER WILLARD and ELEANOR MCDONALD. He was born February 02, 1812 in St. Louis Co., Missouri, and died March 14, 1876 in Madison, Yolo Co., California.

More About MARY ANNE WAKEFIELD:

  • Death Notice: (Los Angeles) At Good Samaritan Hospital, Dec. 7, 1903, Mary A. Willard, Age 82, a native of Wisconsin, pioneer in California.

Children of MARY WAKEFIELD and ALEXANDER WILLIARD are:

3.5.1. JOHN ALLEN WILLIARD, b. March 30, 1838, Platteville, Grant Co., Wisconsin; d. 1924; m. MARY ANN BREEDLOVE.
3.5.2. GEORGE H. WILLIARD, b. December 23, 1840, Platteville, Grant Co., Wisconsin; d. December 14, 1879, Vacaville, California; m. (1) ?; m. (2) ?.
3.5.3. ELIZABETH L. WILLIARD, b. September 22, 1842; d. December 31, 1869, Cottonwood, Yolo Co., California; m. A.E. NOEL.
3.5.4. LYDIA WILLIARD, b. June 02, 1844, Platteville, Grant Co., Wisconsin; d. December 28, 1891, Westminster, Orange Co., California; m. DEXTER DUMPHEY.
3.5.5. CLARA WILLIARD, b. March 09, 1846; d. August 11, 1865.
3.5.6. HENRY T. WILLIARD, b. May 10, 1847.
3.5.7. ISSAC WILLIARD, b. 1849.
3.5.8. ELIZA JANE WILLIARD, b. January 04, 1852; d. August 04, 1893.
3.5.9. FRANKLIN PIERCE WILLIARD, b. December 02, 1853; d. January 10, 1931; m. EMMA GREGG.
3.5.10. JAMES WILLIARD, b. November 17, 1856.
3.5.11. EMILY WILLIARD, b. September 15, 1858; m. ?.
3.5.12. ALEXANDER HAMILTON WILLIARD III, b. February 08, 1860.
3.5.13. COLISTA MARY E. WILLIARD, b. April 18, 1863; d. April 19, 1916; m. ?.
3.5.14. MARIA CLAY WILLIARD, b. January 05, 1866.

3.8. WILLIAM HARRISON THOMPSON WAKEFIELD (JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born December 13, 1834 in Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois, and died July 26, 1913 in Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas. He married RUTH EMMA WAKEFIELD December 22, 1869 in Mound City, Lynn Co., Kansas. She was born September 18, 1846 in Missouri.

More About WILLIAM HARRISON THOMPSON WAKEFIELD:

  • Census 1860: Douglas Co., Kansas

Children of WILLIAM WAKEFIELD and RUTH WAKEFIELD are:

3.8.1. HARRY LOUIS WAKEFIELD, b. April 15, 1870, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois; d. Bef. 1878.
3.8.2. LULU MAY WAKEFIELD, b. October 09, 1872, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois.
3.8.3. CHARLES HENRY WAKEFIELD, b. March 11, 1878, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois.
3.8.4. JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD, b. March 20, 1881, Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois.

3.9. ELIZA J. WAKEFIELD (JOHN ALLEN WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born May 1835 in Vandalia, Fayette Co., Illinois, and died December 07, 1902 in Los Angeles, California. She married GEORGE H. SNYDER September 03, 1851 in Grant, Wisconsin. He was born 1829 in New York.

Child of ELIZA WAKEFIELD and GEORGE SNYDER is:

3.9.1. MARY F. SNYDER, b. July 08, 1851, St. Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota; d. December 21, 1910, Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas; m. DAVID SHIRAR, June 28, 1877, Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas; b. August 14, 1850, Camden, Carroll Co., Illinois; d. March 13, 1926, Pasadena, Los Angeles Co., California.

More About DAVID SHIRAR and MARY SNYDER:

  • Marriage: June 28, 1877, Lawrence, Douglas Co., Kansas
  • Burial: Both buried in Mt. View Maus, Pasadena, Los Angeles, California

4.4. SARAH ANN WAKEFIELD (ANDREW JACKSON WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born 1848 in Quincy, Illinois, and died 1924 in East Highlands, California. She married LEWIS FILMORE CRAM 1865 in Highlands, California. He was born 1834 in Penship Co., New York.

More About SARAH ANN WAKEFIELD:

  • Census 1850: Ursa, Adams Co., Illinois

Child of SARAH WAKEFIELD and LEWIS CRAM is:

4.4.1. ANDREW JACKSON CRAM, b. 1867, East Highlands, California; d. 1928, Highland, California.

9.6. RUDIAN LEMMON III (SARAH WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born January 07, 1843 in Illinois, and died March 12, 1912 in Adams Co., Illinois. He married AMANDA VICTORIA RAWLINGS December 15, 1872 in Adams Co., Illinois. She was born September 10, 1852 in Edna, Missouri.

More About RUDIAN LEMMON III:

  • Census 1850: Adams Co., Illinois

Children of RUDIAN LEMMON and AMANDA RAWLINGS are:

9.6.1. SALLY MAE LEMMON, b. May 30, 1874, Loraine, Adams Co., Illinois; d. June 30, 1961.
9.6.2. OTIS ELMER LEMMON.
9.6.3. RUBY LEA LEMMON.
9.6.4. ASHIEL LEMMON.

Generation No. 4

2.2.1. MARTHA FRANCIS (SUSAN WAKEFIELD, GEORGE WASHINGTON WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born February 14, 1850 in Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas, and died October 26, 1898 in Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas. She married SAMUEL HENRY MOURNING May 21, 1872 in Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas, son of BENJAMIN MOURNING and MARGARET DAVIS. He was born May 20, 1837 in Middleton, Hendricks Co., Indiana, and died September 04, 1889 in Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas.

More About SAMUEL HENRY MOURNING:

  • Burial: Walnut Grove Cem., Devon, Kansas

Children of MARTHA FRANCIS and SAMUEL MOURNING are:

2.2.1.1. IDA MOURNING, b. July 29, 1874, Ft. Scott, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. June 1968, Reno, Washoe Co., Nevada.
2.2.1.2. FRANSINA MOURNING, b. December 14, 1875, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. December 27, 1961.
2.2.1.3. BELLE MOURNING, b. May 05, 1877, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. March 01, 1966, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.
2.2.1.4. JESSE EVELYN MOURNING, b. December 24, 1878, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. April 11, 1947, Stafford, Stafford Co., Kansas.
2.2.1.5. ERNEST MOURNING, b. June 20, 1882, Ft. Scott, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. May 21, 1950, Aurora, Lawrence Co., Missouri.
2.2.1.6. ELMER MOURNING, b. April 12, 1884, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. November 09, 1954, Lamar, Powers Co., Colorado.
2.2.1.7. EDNA LILLIAN MOURNING, b. July 02, 1886, Xenia, Bourbon Co., Kansas; d. September 1981, Lamar, Powers Co., Colorado.

4.4.1. ANDREW JACKSON CRAM (SARAH ANN WAKEFIELD, ANDREW JACKSON WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born 1867 in East Highlands, California, and died 1928 in Highland, California. He married HATTIE D. ELKINS 1892, daughter of SAMUEL ELKINS and ELVIRA WATSON. She was born 1872 in Missouri.

Child of ANDREW CRAM and HATTIE ELKINS is:

4.4.1.1. MOLLIE EMILE CRAM, b. 1896, East Highlands, California; d. 1927, San Bernadino, Los Angeles, California.

9.6.1. SALLY MAE LEMMON (RUDIAN LEMMON III, SARAH WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born May 30, 1874 in Loraine, Adams Co., Illinois, and died June 30, 1961. She married (1) FRED W. DOVER. She married (2) ELDRA NEWTON BUGG December 17, 1892, son of WILLIAM BUGG and ROSANAH MCGRAW. He was born March 07, 1873 in Scotia, Illinois, and died December 06, 1901 in Macombe, Illinois.

Child of SALLY LEMMON and ELDRA BUGG is:

9.6.1.1. DUKE REUDIEN LEMMON BUGG, b. August 14, 1894, Loraine, Adams Co., Illinois; d. March 13, 1983.

Generation No. 5

9.6.1.1. DUKE REUDIEN LEMMON BUGG (SALLY MAE LEMMON, RUDIAN LEMMON III, SARAH WAKEFIELD, WILLIAM HENRY WAKEFIELD, HENRY WAKEFIELD) was born August 14, 1894 in Loraine, Adams Co., Illinois, and died March 13, 1983. He married JANE SARAH JOHNSON. She was born January 21, 1904 in Prarie City, Illinois.

1 comments:

Jean said...

You might be interested in the will of Diana Verner's father in SC where she appears as Diana Wakefield. The will is available on-line at the South Carolina Department of Archives & History. A microfilmed of typed copy is available on-line using their template. This would help you document Diana Verner's life.

 
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